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20130107
20130115
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the obama administration is in the cards. please welcome antonio villaraigosa. [applause] >> thank you theresa for that introduction. before i start, i grew up in a home where we are used to serving ourselves. whenever i am served i would like to thank my servers, can we give them a big hand? [applause] i want to thank the members of the press club for this opportunity to speak to you all today. i am truly honored to be here at one of our country's most venerable institutions of public deliberation. in less than six months my final term as mayor of los angeles will come to a close. with each passing week i take another step toward what one would call the transition from who's who to who's he? the sun may be setting on my administration but i am not writing off into the sunset just yet. the agenda is still packed with challenges. many of those present challenges still demand action. chief among them is immigration reform. there are a few more fundamental questions that we face and who we welcome to our shores, how we secure our borders, what we do to include the members of undocumented
is -- is the obama administration moving towards a policy of indefinite detention? first up to speak will be colonel moat davis, a colonel lawrence davis. he was the chief prosecutor in the guantanamo military commission until he resigned in 2007. he had a distinguished career in the u.s. military. to his right, is andy worthington. he went to new college, oxford and we were colleagues, contemporaries there and we have known each other for a long time. he has been at the forefront of investigating who was at guantanamo. this question was not answered initially. the detainee's did not have lawyers and andy wrote a book published in 2007 that really laid out in a public sense who was at the present and what their stories were he has co- directed a film about the guantanamo detainees and we are happy to have him. he has come from the u.k. just to mark the anniversary of the 11th anniversary. to his right is tom wilner. his case to establish the right of habeas corpus for prisoners. he continues to be involved in representing detainee's. we will start with, moe davis. >> thank you, it is a pleasure to s
over this in federal court. i won in september and the obama administration appealed. [applause] what was fascinating is to they went to judge katherine forest after she gave her technician if -- her decision and her 112- page opinion which is really a brilliant kind of dissection of the destruction of the separation of powers and is worth reading, asked for an emergency stay meaning they wanted the law put back into effect physical the appellate court would hear the case. some he refused. -- she refused. they demanded an emergency hearing with the appellate court at 9:00 a.m. if the morning the next monday for an emergency hearing and an emergency stay which they got. the only reason that i and the lawyers can make out is that the obama administration reacted so aggressively is because they're already using it, probably on pakistani u.s. dowel nationals. the inability to curb wall street, a close examination of the obama health care bill which was written by corporate lobbyists, in particular ms. -- liz fowler who has gone back into the industry. the inability to deal with the most i
in the obama administration. he has the president's absolute trust. he is a very talented cia -- host: what you think the impact has been on the cia? guest: david petraeus is a genuine american hero. i do not condone what he did. the president had the right to accept his resignation. having anyone leave abruptly causes dislocation in an institution. he stepped into the shoes of the director and i think manage things very well. a lot of the policies started by david petraeus will be continued. one is to take a look at women in the cia. there was a committee that david petraeus started and it was under way when he resigned. host: that brings up a headline in "the washington post." guest: as i said numerous times, security is a women's issue. we are lionesses. we are well qualified to sit and any policy table anywhere. many women are. nobody missed the groundswell for the secretary of defense. there are lots of qualified women. four women head the 16 intelligence agencies now. there has never been a woman as head of the cia. i do not see a barrier that a woman cannot meet or overcome. i would hope
noting that hagel is going to meet with senator schumer. it could be a crucial moment in the obama administration efforts to advance the nomination tohagel. he is expected to press mr. hagel on issues concerning iran and israel. who else is hagel set to meet with the this week? >> hagel has been starting to make the rounds on -- he's already started to make the rounds on the telephone and there's been -- there's been some reporting out there on where he's sort of going. he's going to have to. >> you can find the rest of this conversation online. we take you to the floor of the house convening. denham, an >> chairman schuster laid the groundwork in 2006 when his post-karina reform act authorized fema to conduct a number of recovery programs. costs of dramatically reduced, projects were completed faster and the process was more efficient. without making permanent the debris removal program, the taxpayer could pay six times the cost of debris removal and it could take much longer. the individuals and households pilot program incorporated in this bill would reduce costs by a similar am
that the bauks fundamentally shifted its poll di-- obama administration fundamentally shifted its policy by moving away from targeting unauthorized immigrants through high-profile rates to targeting actually employers who hire unauthorized workers. since june -- since january of 2009, i.c.e. has audited more than 8,000 employers. it has debarred 726 companies and imposed about $88 million in criminal monetary fines on employers. a very significant -- and the last thing on the work force that i will touch on is there has been an increased effort on the labor standards enforcement in our country. we all know that labor standards enforcements always takes less priority in our overall enforcement system. there are only 1,100 inspectors in the division to monitor about more than 7.5 million u.s. business establishments. that obviously is not going to do the job as efficiently as one would like to. therefore, the department of labor has more recently gone into more smarter, more targeted enforcement of those employers who habitually violate the laws on the books on labor standards. and in indu
deportations, you can see the total so far during the obama administration, 1.5 million. for the entirety of the bush administration, two terms in office, we saw about two million deportations. and then in 2012 alone, nearly -- more than, rather, 400,000 immigrants deported, which is a record high. our next phone call is from mark in new jersey, republican. hi, mark. caller: good morning. i'm also a municipal chair here -- >> more of this in an hour of video library at c-span.org. would take you now live to president obama and his choice for treasury secretary. >> a little more than four years ago i stood with mr. tim geithner, the first nominee to my cabinet. we were two months into the financial crisis. the stock market had cratered. the stock market -- bank after bank was on the verge of collapse. worst of all, more than 800,000 americans would lose their jobs in just that month. at the bottom was probably not yet in sight. i could not blame tim when he told me he was not the right guy for the job. [laughter] extensivews that tim's experience with economic policy made him eminently qua
. >> this is interesting. it is certainly true that the obama administration has been among the harshest on an external whistle-blowers. however, the obama administration has been -- especially this new administration which managed to cram through a whistle-blower protection act and expand it for government whistleblowers, is offering protections they have not had for decades. so he wants them, whistle- blowers, to be able to work without retaliation within the system. he is very much opposed to information being released willy-nilly by people inside that just ended all over the world. we interviewed assange right after the wikileaks issue, he believes that all information should be there, regardless of the possibility of innocent victims. he is a person who believes that, no matter what the consequences are, the information should be out there. a lot of the wikileaks stuff was pretty niggly stuff, people having affairs or whatever. some of it was big stuff, for sure. some of it was important stuff. the stuff that made a difference when people knew about it was when he partnered with a guardian, a bunc
of you may know that the obama administration tried to start doing that, mostly in the for-profit sector, but not exclusively, and has had a lot of opposition over that. i think we will see more efforts coming in the next four years. the last thing i would say is what i said earlier, which is that for people who do not complete, knowing that this is a factor that leads to default, that we do not make that the final sentence for everybody. let's make it easier for people to transition out of default, to prevent them from getting into default in the first place. the best way to solve the problem is to help people and of succeeding. if you have better completion rates, you have your people in the problem in the first place. >> the key is getting the student who starts to the finish line. the focus on completion rates has a new ones to it. -- nuance to it. one of the easiest ways for college to have good completion rates is to deny admission to high risk students. we need to remove the obstacles that keep students from completing their education. i do not think community colleges are the sol
. who is going to pay them? the obama administration is not likely to cut and run. you see signs in the press to get down to a lower level. level of 6000 is around. if that was to take place, under the afghan security forces operate without the support in forms of air, logistics, and pay, especially when virtually every nato country wants to get out as quickly as possible? we could see a quicker decline in western presence in 2013, rather than 2014. >> would you like to discuss that first? >> this is a legitimate concern. in fact, our defense minister is in town today at the pentagon, discussing some of these issues. he has come with a detailed list of the enablers the afghan national army needs, including, as you mentioned, long-range artillery and intelligence- gathering capabilities. fixed-wing and rotary aircraft for transportation. we have been completely dependent for all of these things on nato and our other friends and allies. again, a lot of these equipments are not as expensive as conducting these operations with nato in afghanistan. if there is a political will, it is
to be the policies of this administration as long as president obama is in office. so, again, i think you've seen what senator hagel said about this, and the president is very confident that senator hagel will be confirmed and that he will be an excellent secretary of defense and will implement all of the president's policies with regards to the defense department. let me move around here. chuck. >> following up on debt ceiling, i know your position hasn't changed on the 14th amendment. do you guys have a position on this trillion-dollar coin business? >> i would simply go back to what i said. the option here is for congress to do its job and pay its bills -- bills that have already been racked up. we saw what happened last summer, the summer of 2011, when congress flirted with the idea of default, didn't even go all the way to default and yet the impact on our economy was severe, the impact on average americans was severe. we had the lowest job creation in the month of august of 2011 of any month during the recovery, and the reason is because of what house republicans did that summer. now, we ca
. the letters are -- governors are committed to a collaboration with congress and the administration to maintain and promote a balanced system. just last month, governor markell and i joined president obama to outline what flexible federalism will look like. the effort deserves to be front and center, because how washington deals with those issues will have an immediate, direct affect on our states and our budget. 30 of the 50 states that we have have had job growth, and we have been able to get to pre- recession levels. oklahoma has been one of those states to experienced job growth. we have now come from seventh% unemployment to 5.2%, one of the highest job growth rates in the nation, but i have to tell you, it was not easy. if -- we have to make good policy and shared sacrifice. as president and congress will address sequestration, we know as governors that spending cuts will be necessary and inevitable, as are the tough decisions they have to make, but we also asked the president, congress in leaders to keep four points in mind. first is federal reform should produce savings for the federal
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)